COP26Monday, October 18, 2021

Vertical farming comes alive at COP26 with IGS

With the eyes of the world falling on Glasgow in November, there is much to discuss, and even more action to be taken. Feeding an exponentially growing global population in a sustainable way is a fundamental challenge which must be addressed through research, innovation and investment.

Vertical farming is one solution that is helping have a positive impact on the horticulture, food production and forestry sectors. Glasgow’s COP26 will welcome the city’s very first vertical farm to showcase how the technology is already having a tangible impact across the world. Sited at the Sustainable Glasgow Landing on the north bank of the River Clyde at Broomielaw, agricultural innovator, IGS, will showcase a 5.4 m high vertical farm from 1-12 November, open to school groups and the public alike.  

Leader of Glasgow City Council, Cllr Susan Aitken commented: “The concept behind the Sustainable Glasgow Landing was to create a space in which local and global organisations could come together to showcase the work they are doing to combat climate change. 

“With the site hosting a vertical farm exhibit and performances taking place throughout COP, we’re excited to see how delegates and members of the public react to seeing it in person. COP26 being held in Glasgow is a huge opportunity for the city and Scottish business more broadly, and we’re delighted to see so much talent and innovation on show.”

David Farquhar, CEO of IGS, commented: “As world leaders and decision makers gather at COP26 in Glasgow in early November, there is clearly a lot on the agenda. However, there are some very notable challenges missing from the programme which must be addressed – most crucially how we plan to feed our exponentially growing populations whilst reducing the dramatic negative impact food production has on our climate.  

“Agriculture is now the leading contributor to the climate crisis, but it is equally one of the most vital to sustaining human life. We need to address how we grow our food and think about it differently, to understand what can be done now and in the future to feed our populations sustainably.”

IGS invites you to learn what’s not working in our current food supply chains, how they are contributing to the climate crisis, then step into the future of farming and gain a positive taste of what is to come.  

The Sustainable Glasgow Landing has transformed a vacant riverside site for the duration of COP26 into a vibrant space where climate and social justice movements meet the arts. There is a packed events programme, and visitors are invited to explore a range of exhibitions, from Passivhaus technologies and sustainable power generation through to active travel solutions and collaborative art pieces.  

Find out more about the exhibitors and the full programme of events here: https://www.thesustainableglasgowlanding.com/.

What you will see at the marquee:

  • Interactive exhibition showcasing how vertical farming can work to supplement traditional agriculture to deliver more sustainable food supply chains  
  • 5.4m high demonstration vertical farm filled with crops and lit by LEDs (see attached visual)
  • Our talking, moving robot carrying crops and welcoming guests.

IGS opening hours:

10am – 5:30pm Monday to Sunday (1-12 November 2021)

You can also explore more on our COP26 Microsite

Written by

Georgia Lea

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